Upcomming / Current Exhibition

Upcomming / Current Exhibition

Confronting Eyes

February 26(Wed.)2020-September 27(Sun.)2020

Taro Okamoto started his career as a ‘western-style’ painter, but the subjects of his paintingsdiffered greatly from those commonly used by other western-style artists. This is because he did not use any of the usual western-style genres, such as landscapes, portraits, still-lifes or nudes.

Past Exhibition

Taro Okamoto’s Prints

February 26(Wed.)2020-September 27(Sun.)2020 Extended the piriod

This is how Taro Okamoto thought about art and he employed every possible channel to try and bring art into the lives of the people. His range of expression included a huge range of genres, from the Tower of the Sun to tiepins. One of the characteristics of his work was that he engaged positively with mass production to create large numbers of works, such as: tables, chairs, clocks, lighters, bags, carp streamers, skis, cups, ties, scarfs, playing cards, etc. His pièce de résistance was a ‘face glass’ that came free with a bottle of whiskey. Those around him were very against him producing this, saying it would harm his career, but he overrode their objections and was happy to create this kind of giveaway product. Underlying this stance was his belief that ‘Art should not belong solely to enthusiasts or rich people, but rather to the general public.’ The reason why he created numerous works of public art to be placed throughout the country or small items to be handed out for free, was all due to his belief that ‘art is part of life.’ One media that Taro concentrated on to achieve this was prints. He probably felt that prints would be able to find their way into the lives of the common people and utilized a variety of techniques including lithograph, etching, silkscreen, woodblock, etc., leaving a huge range of print works. This special exhibition focuses on his prints for the first time and we hope that you will enjoy it.

Akiomi Hirano, Director,Taro Okamoto Memorial Museum

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The Original Image of Japan

Period: October 30 (Wed.) 2019 - February 24 (Mon.) 2020

Taro Okamoto was a person who continually asked the question, ‘What is Japan?’ Having decided to leave Paris and return home to fight for Japan, Taro had a fateful encounter one day in November 1951.

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Life in Five Hundred Million Years’ Time — Yōichirō Kawaguchi: beyond AI

Period: June 26 (Wed.) – October 27 (Sun.) 2019

‘Let’s imagine what it will be like five hundred million years into the future, a time when humankind may no longer exist.’ So says Yōichirō Kawaguchi, a pioneer computer graphics artist who has been active on the world stage since the seventies. This is not simply a fancy.

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Art of the Sun—Tarō Okamoto’s Public Art—

Period: February 27 (Wed.) – June 23 (Sun.) 2019

Art is like the sun. The sun provides limitless light and heat.
Even if you have been sunbathing, the sun doesn’t put out its hand and say, ‘Hey, that was lovely and warm, how about giving me some money?’ does it? Art is like the sun. That is what Tarō Okamoto thought.

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Living Moment by Moment —Tarō Okamoto and Jazz—

Period: October 17, (Wed.) 2018 – February 24 2019 (Sun.) 2019

‘In my life I ignore the past and I ignore the future. I live in the present, exploding, moment by moment.’
Neither clinging to the past nor presuming upon the future.
This was the way that Tarō Okamoto lived.

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The Road to the Tower of the Sun

Period: May 30 (Wed.) – October 14 (Sun.) 2018

In March 2018, the Tower of the Sun was finally reborn. After half a century of neglect the interior has been restored and reincarnated as a permanent exhibition facility.

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Tower of the Sun 1967–2018 —What did Tarō Okamoto Question—

Period: Part I. October 13(Fri)2017 – February 18 (Sun) 2018 Part II. February 21 (Wed) — May 27 (Sun) 2018

In March 2018 the Tower of the Sun will finally be reborn. Taking advantage of the opportunity presented by seismic retrofitting work on the tower, the long-neglected interior has been renovated and transformed into a permanent exhibition space.

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Tarō Okamoto’s Tōhoku

Period: July 1 (Sat.) - October 9 (Mon.), 2017 In association with Taro Okamoto Museum of Art, Kawasaki

In 1957, five years after he discovered Jōmon culture, Tarō Okamoto set out on a trip in search of the true essence of Japanese culture and the first place he visited was the Tōhoku region, where he encountered ‘primeval Japan’.
Tōhoku was a poor region, cut off from the rest of the country in the winter, but there he discovered a ‘spirit of magic’ in dialog with an invisible power, still existed.

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Twenty Year’s of the TARO Award/Twenty Enfants Terrible

Exhibition Period: March 12 (Sun)— June 18 (Sun), 2017

Left alone following Tarō Okamoto’s death, Toshiko proved much more resilient than many of us had feared. She said that it was her job to transmit a knowledge of Tarō’s work to the next generation and set about achieving this without delay.

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